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20130318
20130326
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of hezbollah, israel, between 2006 and 2009, went to the right. both the public opinion and the government. so the drama of the collision between the president seeking to draw close to arab and muslims and israeli government veering to the right, intensified the tension that manifested itself at the time. and add to this the fact that between the president and the prime minister at that time, there was no trust. i mean both ambassador indyk and myself sat on wt is normally known as one-on-one, but always is two on two because there has to be a notetaker. and both of us were fortunate enough to take notes in very decisive meetings between clinton, rabin and so forth. and you can see what happens when the two decision makers like each other and trust each other. and when they don't. and unfortunately, during the first four years there was a lack of trust between obama and netanyahu. and this is something that will transpire later but to me, e of the most important potential outcomes of this visit would be to restore or to build from the outset. >> rose: a relationship between netanyahu and obama
brewing in the israeli policy circles about how active should israel be in going after hezbollah convoys, take ought strategic weaponry? israel ills not -- i find that there's no one in israel that i met thinks the united states -- maybe you think this is a big mistake and i'm not talking to the right people, but of all the people i talked to i didn't mean anyone that thought the u.s. would be decisive in syria. they just see the ute as such a mess, they don't see how at it going to be reversed. but at the same time they're concerned that hezbollah and taking whatever weapons they can, either into lebanon or keeping it in a part of syria they deem friendly as a kind of a depot of their open. here there are a lot of israelis who want to start the more pro-active hezbollah conveys there, that -- that convoy, the theys are stunned the russias have given this antiship missile which can hit things in the israeli port before they leave the port. very advanced missiles. and they're wondering where hezbollah is going next. so i it's not reshaping syria. they think that's above their pay grade bu
these chemical weapons or transferred these chemical weapons let's say to hezbollah or some other groups, that would presumably result in u.s. military action. i assume that's the threat out there, john. >> well, that is the threat. but then think about what that means. the president has been very clear his national security team has been very clear they don't see any scenarios under which you would put u.s. boots on the ground. would there be some special operations to try to take out additional chemical weapons? certainly the president would say he would want the regime held to justice after the fact. but what do you do in the short term? that is the big question. do you do more to help the opposition or is there a direct u.s. military role? if you take out -- it is very dangerous to take out a chemical weapons site. if you just bomb a chemical weapons site you can disperse the chemicals and do more harm than good. one of the reasons the u.s. has not talked at all about any military options is they range from bad to worse. it would be a tough dilemma for this president if he thought he
're really hezbollah or hamas, do you think the saudies are going to tell us? >> here in the united states they must satisfy a security process including an interview with a customs agent. i mean, that sounds more rigorous than when you just pass through customs when you're arriving in the u.s. and going through customs, no? >> in coordination, however, with the minister of interior of saudi arabia. in other words, it's a joint vetting process and the details, as you correctly point out, are not exactly clear at this point. yes, you're right that the united states government still has vetting appropriations, jurisdiction, over these applicants. >> megyn: how thorough will it it be? we're short on time, but i want to ask you, why are we doing this? we don't do it for germany and france, why are we doing it for the saudies. >> i think it has to do with all and the fact that, you remember after al attempted attack, the underwear bomber three years ago, saudi arabia was on the list of secondary countries to be inspected. and they complained bitterly, and it was taken off in weeks, and i think
in peace. hezbollah is a terror organization, not a political movement. the collect missiles. they are trigger happy. they hide it may -- missiles and peaceful towns and villages, and by doing so, they make them award target. they divide the man on the politically -- lebanon politically. it turned the land of the free the land of scorched citizens. apart fromivate army the national army. they send that soldiers to support the massacre of the bloody dictators of syria without the organization of the government of which they are a member of. in history 20 terror attempts were counted. india, thailand, georgia, south africa, united states, greece among others. last month the government of of the european union identified a terrorist attack was carried out by hezbollah. cyprus recently arrested a terrorist planning a terror attack. distinguished member of parliament. save the 11 on from terrorist madness. save the people. save citizens and hours from hezbollah. the national committee has to designate them as a terrorist organization because they are a terrorist organization. rece
and advanced conventional weapons reaching the wrong hands. wrong hands could be hezbollah in lebanon. an ally of assad. regime of damascus. or opposition groups that may be outside the realm of what the intelligence community knows about. this information is shared and israelis said they would react again and have reacted by military in lebanon. beth parties are very concerned about what is happening in syria and of course chemical weapons are first among them. i think this is a very volatile situation that could develop any week as we saw yesterday with the latest report. >> andrea mitchell was reporting how this could be a new beginning for netanyahu and obama. how there was more warmth between them or less after chill between them might be a better way of phrasing it. but i wonder to the extent that true, how much do you think that has to do with the simple fact that obama was re-elected last year? so much of the frostiness in the first term seemed to be na netanyahu was basically betting that obama would be a one-term president. betting on romney victory. here is the re-elected more confi
missiles from hamas and hezbollah in the northern part of the country. iron dome battery is financed by the united states. u.s. put $300 million in this. it is one of things president obama is doing to show his support for israel. he has a speech nationally televised to about a thousand college students. that comes tomorrow. you can expect him to do a direct sell to the israeli people what are the ideas for the country and middle east going forward. why that is the right thing. during his first term the israeli people large lay thought president obama ignored them. you will a lot of one-on-one salesmanship going forward. my grandmother used to say not what you say but how you say it. this is how you say it trip. martha: that is great advice from your grandmother. they were trying to say it very, very well at the initial meeting, it was he have evident. leland, thank you very much. bill: remarkable, martha when you look at the geography for the country of israel. here is the region here. lebanon to the north. israel down here. what we wanted to show you the threat the israelis live wi
from outside from iran on -- and hezbollah on one side and from saudi arabia, qatar and other states on the other. if there's any hope of diffusing the conflict, one way is going to have to deal with the issues of iranian support. iran is deeply concerned because syria is the major foothold in the arab world. there's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their peo
and it is not just al qaeda it is hezbollah and hamas are in there. ncouragement ofypt, we had the muslim brotherhood presidency which more and more we find out, it has been an effort to undermine everything in the middle east, and of course iran and that problem is not going away. the president has made a bold move in the middle east and i think in terms of these we countries silt not working. >> let me say about the chemical weapons he had the head of the intelligence committee saying it appears they used, the syrian government, syrian weapons outside aleppo, i think it was. the president, in israel, at a press conference, said he didn't think they did use it. now, the intelligence committee, and the chairman, he is get that from the obama executive branch. someone is telling them one thing and the president is saying something else. they need to get their act in gear. >> the republicans put together, some of them, a report that they called an autopsy, why they called it an autopsy i have no idea but that is the word they used, 100-page report saying certain positions on social issues, gentleman, a
consequences and fear of spilling out and hezbollah looms large. >> wish we had more historical depth how we look at this. this is the third arab state to be devastated by a civil war. without pointing fingers of blame, lebanon for 15 years was devastated by civil war. foreign armies, foreign intelligence services. after the u.s. invasion in 2003 iraq went through a different but similar process. >> let's point fingers, please. >> in case of iraq we can point finger at the bush administration, it's very clear. it's not just displacement of millions of people. it's not just people being slaughtered which is happening in syria. it's the deconstruction of stooss of state, the idea of a state of law, all -- >> the worst elements of society. >> exactly. giving free rein to people whose objectives and aims and means are horrific as far as, including most syrians are concerned or most iraqis and lebanese were concerned and stopping this as quickly as possible is something we should be concerned about. as this continues, the radicalization and extremism gets worse. >> the ripple effect, the reason w
's not about shiite and sunni and hezbollah. i think the real urgent issue i think they have to move forward because we are witness to a great tragedy in that part of the world. >> but, alex, it always turns back to the united states. afghanistan, after 9/11. iraq when, you know, a lot of our allies, other than french, the french were saying, got weapons of mass destruction we have to do about it now in syria. do we continue to exist in the middle of an international order where nothing is done unless it's kids from kansas and california and upstate new york and florida that do the fighting? >> yeah. i think this is one of those moments where, i think, you can almost sense the internal conflict in the white house giving the agagenocide. i don't know how the president will commit any troops given the state of affair of our troops when they return home, 600,000 veterans are stale waiting for their claims to send more boys and women, men and women over there. it would not seem to be any actual support for that. at the same time, how do you reconcile that with the blood shed? 70,000 people are d
that hezbollah's ally assad's regime has sock piled rockets, we will guard against that. i made it clear to assad and all that follow his orders, we will chemicalate the use of weapons or the transfer of those weapons. the world is watching and we will hold you accountable. [applause] the syrian people have the right to be free from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill s own people than relinquish power. assad must go so a serious future can begin. because true stability in syria depends on establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. that this is what i think about when i think about israel's security. when i think about israel's security i also think about the people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with a government that is called for iran's disruption. no wound their israel views this as a threat. this is not simply a challenge for israel but it is a danger for the entire world, including the united states. [applause] a nuclear-armed iran will raise the r
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)